Rochin v. California
342 U.S. 165 (1952)

Annotate this Case

U.S. Supreme Court

Rochin v. California, 342 U.S. 165 (1952)

Rochin v. California

No. 83

Argued October 16, 1951

Decided January 2, 1952

342 U.S. 165

Syllabus

Having "some information" that petitioner was selling narcotics, three state officers entered his home and forced their way into the bedroom occupied by him and his wife. When asked about two capsules lying on a bedside table, petitioner put them in his mouth. After an unsuccessful struggle to extract them by force, the officers took petitioner to a hospital, where an emetic was forced into his stomach against his will. He vomited two capsules which were found to contain morphine. These were admitted in evidence over his objection, and he was convicted in a state court of violating a state law forbidding possession of morphine.

Held: The conviction is reversed, because it was obtained by methods violative of the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Pp. 342 U. S. 166-174.

101 Cal. App. 2d 140, 225 P. 2d 1, reversed.

In a California state court, petitioner was convicted of violating a state law forbidding the possession of morphine. The District Court of Appeal affirmed. 101 Cal. App. 2d 140, 225 P. 2d 1. The State Supreme Court denied a review. This Court granted certiorari. 341 U.S. 939. Reversed, p. 342 U. S. 174.

Page 342 U. S. 166

Official Supreme Court caselaw is only found in the print version of the United States Reports. Justia caselaw is provided for general informational purposes only, and may not reflect current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. We make no warranties or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this site or information linked to from this site. Please check official sources.