General Electric Co. v. Jewel Incandescent Lamp Co.
326 U.S. 242 (1945)

Annotate this Case

U.S. Supreme Court

General Electric Co. v. Jewel Incandescent Lamp Co., 326 U.S. 242 (1945)

General Electric Co. v. Jewel Incandescent Lamp Co.

No. 46

Argued October 18, 19, 1945

Decided November 5, 1945

326 U.S. 242

Syllabus

1. Pipkin Patent No. 1,687,510 for a frosted glass electric lamp bulb, characterized by the presence on the interior of rounded instead of sharp, angular crevices so as to strengthen resistance against breakage by impact, held invalid for want of invention. Pp. 326 U. S. 243, 326 U. S. 248.

2. It did not appear that, prior to the patent in question, electric bulbs had been frosted on the interior with rounded, rather than sharp, angular crevices. But an earlier patent, as well as the art which preceded it, showed how to produce such a surface on the exterior of electric bulbs, and another earlier patent showed how to frost the inside of an electric bulb. Held that, in view of these disclosures, there could be no invention in frosting either the outside or inside of an electric bulb so as to produce rounded, rather than sharp, angular crevices. Principle of Ansonia Brass & Copper Co. v. Electric Supply Co.,144 U. S. 11, applied. Pp. 326 U. S. 247-249.

3. Where the method of the manufacture of an article is known, more than a new advantage of the product must be discovered in order to claim invention. P. 326 U. S. 249.

146 F.2d 414 affirmed.

Certiorari, 324 U.S. 838, to review affirmance of an order, 47 F.Supp. 818, dismissing a suit for infringement of a patent.

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