Beard v. United States
158 U.S. 550 (1895)

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U.S. Supreme Court

Beard v. United States, 158 U.S. 550 (1895)

Beard v. United States

No. 542

Submitted March 13, 1895

Decided May 27, 1895

158 U.S. 550

Syllabus

A man assailed on his own grounds, without provocation, by a person armed with a deadly weapon and apparently seeking his life is not obliged to retreat, but may stand his ground and defend himself with such means as are within his control; and so long as there is no intent on his part to kill his antagonist, and no purpose of doing anything beyond what is necessary to save his own life, is not guilty of murder or manslaughter if death results to his antagonist from a blow given him under such circumstances.

The case is stated in the opinion.

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