Wan Shing v. United States
140 U.S. 424 (1891)

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U.S. Supreme Court

Wan Shing v. United States, 140 U.S. 424 (1891)

Wan Shing v. United States

No. 1414

Submitted April 10, 1891

Decided May 11, 1891

140 U.S. 424

APPEAL FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED

STATES FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA

Syllabus

The result of the legislation respecting the Chinese would seem to be this, that no laborers of that race shall hereafter be permitted to enter the United States, or even to return after having departed from the country, though they may have previously resided therein and have left with a view of returning, and that all other persons of that race, except those connected with the diplomatic service, must produce a certificate from the authorities of the Chinese government, or of such other foreign government as they may at the time be subjects of, showing that they are not laborers and have the permission of that government to enter the United States, which certificate is to be vised by a representative of the government of the United States.

The case, as stated by the Court, was as follows:

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