Salomon v. United States
86 U.S. 17

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U.S. Supreme Court

Salomon v. United States, 86 U.S. 19 Wall. 17 17 (1873)

Salomon v. United States

86 U.S. (19 Wall.) 17

Syllabus

1. The act of June, 1862, requiring contracts for military supplies to be in writing, is not infringed by the proper officer having charge of such matter accepting delivery of such supplies after the day stipulated, nor is a verbal agreement to extend the time of performance invalid.

2. When, under a written contract made by a person to deliver such supplies as, ex. gr., corn at one time fixed, the quartermaster in charge receives part of the corn from such person for the government, and then at a later date, no objection being made to the delay, receives the rest, and gives a receipt and voucher for the amount and the price, and the government uses such part of it as it wants and suffers the remainder to decay by exposure and neglect, there is an implied contract to pay the value of such corn, which value may, in the absence of other testimony, be presumed to be the price fixed in the voucher by the quartermaster.

A statute of June 2, 1862, * thus enacts:

"It shall be the duty of the Secretary of War, Secretary of the Navy &c., to cause and require every contract made by them severally on behalf of the government, or by their officers under them appointed, to be reduced to writing, and signed by the contracting parties with their names at the end thereof. "

Page 86 U. S. 18

This statute being in force, Salomon entered into a written contract on the 28th of July, 1864, with the Quartermaster's Department to deliver at Fort Fillmore 12,000 bushels of corn at such times and in such quantities, of not less than 1,000 bushels per month, as the assistant quartermaster should direct, 9,000 bushels before the 1st day of January and the whole amount by the 1st day of May, 1865. The 9,000 bushels were delivered and paid for before the 1st day of May, and about this there was no dispute. Some negotiations took place afterwards between Salomon and the quartermaster of that military department concerning the delivery of the remainder, the finding in regard to which was not very clear. Salomon did, however, deliver the remainder of the corn at Fort Fillmore October 15, 1865, by depositing it in the military storehouse at that place. The chief quartermaster's clerk afterwards examined this corn, weighed some of the sacks, counted the remainder, and gave to Salomon a receipt for the amount, stating that it completed his contract. This clerk then and there accepted and took actual possession of the corn, and the chief quartermaster gave to Salomon the usual voucher for the sum due. The corn was sound when delivered, but was injured by reason of the defective and leaky condition of the storehouse at Fort Fillmore.

The government declining to pay the amount of the voucher, Salomon filed a petition in the court below for payment. The court decreed that he should be paid for a part of what he had finally delivered and which the government used, but not for the residue, which had proved unserviceable and been lost by decay arising from the defective and leaky condition of the storehouse. Salomon took this appeal.

Page 86 U. S. 19

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