Saia v. New York
334 U.S. 558 (1948)

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U.S. Supreme Court

Saia v. New York, 334 U.S. 558 (1948)

Saia v. New York

No. 504

Argued March 30, 1948

Decided June 7, 1948

334 U.S. 558

Syllabus

A city ordinance forbidding the use of sound amplification devices in public places except with the permission of the Chief of Police and prescribing no standards for the exercise of his discretion is unconstitutional on its face, since it establishes a previous restraint on the right of free speech in violation of the First Amendment, made applicable to the states by the Fourteenth Amendment.

Pp. 334 U. S. 558-562. 297 N.Y. 659, 76 N.E.2d 323, reversed.

Appellant was convicted of violating a city ordinance forbidding the use of sound amplification devices except with the permission of the Chief of Police. The County Court and the New York Court of Appeals affirmed. 297 N.Y. 659, 76 N.E.2d 323. On appeal to this Court, reversed, p. 334 U. S. 562.

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