Bank of the United States v. Martin
30 U.S. 479 (1831)

Annotate this Case

U.S. Supreme Court

Bank of the United States v. Martin, 30 U.S. 5 Pet. 479 479 (1831)

Bank of the United States v. Martin

30 U.S. (5 Pet.) 479

Syllabus

The District Court of the United States for the State of Alabama has not jurisdiction of suits instituted by the Bank of the United States. This jurisdiction is not given in the act of Congress establishing that court, nor is it conferred by the act incorporating, the Bank of the United States.

Mr. Webster stated, that on inspecting the record of the proceedings in the court below, he was satisfied the District Court of Alabama had not jurisdiction of suits instituted by the Bank of the United States. It has already been decided that the courts of the United States have jurisdiction in suits brought by the bank only by virtue of the special provision in the charter, and the right of the bank to sue in the District Court of Alabama is not given by the act incorporating the bank. He referred to the tenth section of the Act of Congress of September 1789, and to the Act of 21 April, 1820, constituting the courts of Louisiana. Bank of the United States v. Deveaux, 5 Cranch 61.

Official Supreme Court caselaw is only found in the print version of the United States Reports. Justia caselaw is provided for general informational purposes only, and may not reflect current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. We make no warranties or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this site or information linked to from this site. Please check official sources.