Jackson v. Twentyman
27 U.S. 136 (1829)

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U.S. Supreme Court

Jackson v. Twentyman, 27 U.S. 2 Pet. 136 136 (1829)

Jackson v. Twentyman

27 U.S. (2 Pet.) 136

ERROR TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF

THE SOUTHERN CIRCUIT OF NEW YORK

Syllabus

The 11th section of the act of 1789 must be construed in connection with and in conformity with the Constitution of the United States. By this latter, the judicial power does not extend to private suits in which an alien is a party unless a citizen be the adverse party, and it is indispensable to aver the citizenship of the defendants to show on the record the jurisdiction of the court.

The description of the parties on the record was "John Twentyman, a subject of the king of Great Britain vs. Daniel and Joseph Jackson," no citizenship of the defendants being argued.

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