South Carolina v. Seymour - 153 U.S. 353 (1894)


U.S. Supreme Court

South Carolina v. Seymour, 153 U.S. 353 (1894)

South Carolina v. Seymour

No. 1140

Submitted April 9, 1894

Decided May 14, 1894

153 U.S. 353

Syllabus

On a writ of mandamus in behalf of a state to the Commissioner of Patents to register, under the Act of March 3, 1881, c. 138, a trademark used by the state on intoxicating liquors in commerce with a foreign nation, and which the Commissioner of Patents has refused to register on the ground that the state, by its own laws, had no authorized trade in liquors outside of its limits, the validity of an authority exercised under the United States is not drawn in question, and therefore, in the absence of evidence of the value of the registration, a judgment of the Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia denying the writ of mandamus cannot be reviewed by this Court on writ of error under the Act of February 9, 1893, c. 74, § 8.

This was a motion to dismiss for want of jurisdiction a writ of error to review a judgment of the Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia denying a writ of mandamus to the Commissioner of Patents to register a trademark under the Act of March 3, 1881, c. 138, 21 Stat. 502. The case is stated in the opinion.



Official Supreme Court caselaw is only found in the print version of the United States Reports. Justia caselaw is provided for general informational purposes only, and may not reflect current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. We make no warranties or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this site or information linked to from this site. Please check official sources.