Field v. Clark
143 U.S. 649 (1892)

Annotate this Case

U.S. Supreme Court

Field v. Clark, 143 U.S. 649 (1892)

Field v. Clark

Nos. 1052, 1049, 1050

Argued November 30, December 1-2, 1891

Decided February 29, 1892

143 U.S. 649

APPEAL FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED

STATES FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS

Syllabus

The signing by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and by the President of the Senate, in open session, of an enrolled bill is an official attestation by the two Houses of such bill as one that has passed Congress, and when the bill thus attested receives the approval of the President and is deposited in the Department of State according to law, its authentication as a bill that has passed Congress is complete and unimpeachable.

Page 143 U. S. 650

It is not competent to show from the journals of either House of Congress that an act so authenticated, approved and deposited, did not pass in the precise form in which it was signed by the presiding officers of the two Houses and approved by the President.

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