Holden v. Minnesota
137 U.S. 483 (1890)

Annotate this Case

U.S. Supreme Court

Holden v. Minnesota, 137 U.S. 483 (1890)

Holden v. Minnesota

No. 1237

Argued November 20-21, 1890

Decided December 8, 1890

137 U.S. 483

APPEAL FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED

STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF MINNESOTA

Syllabus

Section 4 of the Minnesota statute of April 24, 1889, Gen.Laws Minn. 1889, c. 20, providing that in case of sentence of death for murder in the first degree, the convict shall he kept in solitary confinement after the issue of the warrant of execution by the governor, and only certain persons allowed to visit him, is an independent provision, applicable only to offenses committed after its passage, and is not ex post facto.

Section 7 of that statute, which repeals all acts or parts of acts inconsistent with its provisions, does not repeal the previous statute which prescribes the punishment of murder in the first degree by death by hanging, and that the execution should take place only after the issue of a warrant of execution.

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