Oregon Ry. & Nav. Co. v. Oregonian Ry. Co., Ltd.
130 U.S. 1 (1889)

Annotate this Case

U.S. Supreme Court

Oregon Ry. & Nav. Co. v. Oregonian Ry. Co., Ltd., 130 U.S. 1 (1889)

Oregon Railway and Navigation Company v.

Oregonian Railway Company, Limited

No. 26

Argued April 27, 30, May 1, 1888

Decided March 5, 1889

130 U.S. 1

ERROR TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED

STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF OREGON

Syllabus

In the United States, a corporation can only have an existence under the express law of the state by which it is created, and can exercise no power or authority which is not granted to it by the charter under which it exists, or by some other legislative act.

When a statute makes a grant of property, powers, or franchises to a private corporation or to a private individual, the construction of the grant in doubtful points should always be against the grantee and in favor of the government, and this general rule of construction applies with still greater force to articles of association organizing a corporation under general laws.

Official Supreme Court caselaw is only found in the print version of the United States Reports. Justia caselaw is provided for general informational purposes only, and may not reflect current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. We make no warranties or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this site or information linked to from this site. Please check official sources.