More v. Steinbach
127 U.S. 70 (1888)

Annotate this Case

U.S. Supreme Court

More v. Steinbach, 127 U.S. 70 (1888)

More v. Steinbach

No. 176

Submitted February 9, 1888

Decided April 16, 1888

127 U.S. 70

APPEAL FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED

STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA

Syllabus

The Act of Congress of March 3, 1801, "to ascertain and settle the private land claims in the State of California," 9 Stat. 631, c. 41, created a board of commissioners to which all persons claiming land by virtue of any right or title derived from the Spanish or Mexican government were required to present their claims for examination and determination within two years from its date, with such documentary evidence and testimony of witnesses as they relied upon to support their claims, and provided in substance that if upon examination they were found by the board and by the courts of the United States to which an appeal could be taken to be valid, the claims should be confirmed and surveyed, and patents issued therefor to the claimants, but that all lands the claims to which were not presented to the board within that period should be considered as a part of the public domain of the United States.

Held:

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