Yale Lock Mfg. Co. v. James
125 U.S. 447 (1888)

Annotate this Case

U.S. Supreme Court

Yale Lock Mfg. Co. v. James, 125 U.S. 447 (1888)

Yale Lock Manufacturing Company v. James

No. 162

Argued February 3, 6, 1888

Decided April 9, 1888

125 U.S. 447

Syllabus

A patent granted in 1871 for an improvement in post office boxes was reissued in 1872 and again in 1877 and again in 1879. The original patent limited the invention to a metallic frontage made continuous by connecting the adjoining frames to each other, and not merely to the woodwork. There was no mistake, and the original patent was not defective or insufficient in either the descriptive portion or the claims. In the progress of the first reissue through the Patent Office, the applicant, on its requirement, struck out of the proposed specification everything which suggested any other mode of fastening than one by which the frames were to be fastened to each other. Held that the first reissue could not have been construed as claiming any other mode of fastening; that therefore the third reissue could not be construed as claiming any other mode of fastening, and that, as the defendant's structures would not have infringed any claim of the original patent, they could not be held to infringe any claim of the third reissue.

In equity to restrain infringement of letters patent. Decree dismissing the bill. Complainant appealed. The case is stated in the opinion of the court.

Page 125 U. S. 451

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