Louisville v. Savings Bank
104 U.S. 469 (1881)

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U.S. Supreme Court

Louisville v. Savings Bank, 104 U.S. 469 (1881)

Louisville v. Savings Bank

104 U.S. 469

Syllabus

1. When necessary to determine conflicting rights, courts of justice will take cognizance of the fractions of a day.

2. The section of the Constitution of Illinois entitled "Municipal subscriptions to railroads or private corporations" (infra, p. 104 U. S. 471), which took effect July 2, 1370, did not invalidate township bonds, which, pursuant to a vote cast at an election of the voters of the township lawfully held on that day, before closing the polls of the general election, were issued to pay a previously voted donation, that was to be raised by special tax.

3. Harter v. Kernochan,103 U. S. 562, cited and approved.

This was an action brought by the Portsmouth Savings Bank against the township of Louisville, Clay County, Illinois, upon coupons detached from bonds issued Jan. 5, 1871, by the supervisor and town clerk to the Springfield and Illinois Southeastern Railway Company, which was formed in February, 1870, by the consolidation of the Illinois Southeastern Railway Company with the Pana, Springfield, and Northwestern Railroad Company. The bonds, fifteen in number, bear date April 1, 1870, and each recites that it

"is one of a series of bonds issued by said township to aid in the construction of the Illinois Southeastern Railway, in pursuance of the authority conferred by an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled 'An Act to incorporate the Illinois Southeastern Railway Company,' approved Feb. 25, 1867, and an act amendatory thereof, approved Feb. 24, 1869, and an election of the legal voters of the aforesaid township, held on the tenth day of November, 1868, under the provisions of said act."

The inhabitants, legal voters of the township, pursuant to notice, duly and lawfully issued, met July 2, 1870, at 9 A.M., for the purpose of deciding by vote

"whether a special tax be levied for the payment of the sum of $15,000, donated by said town to the Illinois Southeastern Railway Company, or that bonds be issued for the payment of said donation."

Fifty-two votes were cast for bonds and two for a special tax.

Page 104 U. S. 470

The supervisor filed, Jan. 9, 1871, the requisite sworn certificate of that date with the state auditor, who thereupon registered in his office the bonds, each being for $1,000. The bonds were delivered to the company after the first coupon had been cut from each and destroyed. The plaintiff was a bona fide holder for value of them without notice of anything impairing their validity other than what appears upon the face of them, or in the Constitution and laws of Illinois. The remaining facts are stated in the opinion of the court. Judgment was rendered for the plaintiff, and the township sued out this writ of error.

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