Seward v. Corneau
102 U.S. 161 (1880)

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U.S. Supreme Court

Seward v. Corneau, 102 U.S. 161 (1880)

Seward v. Corneau

102 U.S. 161

Syllabus

A bond is not sufficient for the purposes of either an appeal to this Court or a supersedeas if the obligors are not thereby bound for the payment of costs should the appellant fail to make his plea good.

This suit, brought in a state court of Louisiana to enjoin a proceeding known as an order of seizure and sale, was, on the petition of the complainants, removed to the circuit court, where, on a final hearing, their bill was dismissed. From the decree they prayed for an appeal, which was allowed, with an

Page 102 U. S. 162

order that it should

"operate as a supersedeas and stay of execution until the final decree of the Supreme Court should be rendered therein, on the complainants giving bond in the sum of $1,000."

The bond given was approved by the district judge. It is subject to the condition that we, the appellants,

"will well and truly pay to the said defendants in said appeal and suit all such damages as they may recover against us in case it should be decided that the said appeal was wrongfully obtained."

The appellees now move to dismiss the appeal upon the ground that the bond does not conform to the requirements of the statute or to the twenty-ninth rule of this Court.

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